Important Update from the RCVS and DEFRA

regarding consent for Veterinary Osteopaths, Chiropractors and Physiotherapists to Treat Animals

Important information for Owners, vets and practitioners, there has been a clarification regarding consent from vets for #animalosteopath, #animalchiropractor and #aniamlphysiotherapist practitioners to treat animals.The update from #RCVS can be found on their website at: https://www.rcvs.org.uk

The following update has come from RAMP (#RAMP #RAMPregister)

www.rampregister.org
RCVS Guidance clarification for MSK Practitioners. The following Guidance has been passed by the RCVS Standards Committee and will be circulated among the veterinary profession:

a) Musculoskeletal therapists are part of the vet-led team. Animals cared for or treated by musculoskeletal therapists must be registered with a veterinary surgeon. Musculoskeletal therapists carry out a range of manipulative therapies, including physiotherapy, osteopathy and chiropractic therapy.

b) As per the Veterinary Surgery (Exemptions) Order 2015, remedial treatment by ‘physiotherapy’ requires delegation by a veterinary surgeon who has first examined the animal. ‘Physiotherapy’ is interpreted as including all kinds of manipulative therapy. It therefore includes osteopathy and chiropractic but would not, for example, include acupuncture or aromatherapy. It is up to the professional judgment of the veterinary surgeon to determine whether and when a clinical examination should be repeated before musculoskeletal treatment is continued.

c) The delegating veterinary surgeon should ensure, before delegation, that they are confident that the musculoskeletal therapist is appropriately qualified and competent; indicators can include membership of a voluntary register with associated standards of education and conduct, supported by a disciplinary process. As the RCVS does not regulate musculoskeletal therapists it cannot recommend specific voluntary registers.

d) Musculoskeletal maintenance care for a healthy animal, for instance massage, does not require delegation by a veterinary surgeon. However, the animal must still be registered with a veterinary surgeon. Maintenance should cease and the owner of the animal should be asked to take their animal to a veterinary surgeon for clinical examination at the first sign that there may be any underlying injury, disease or pathology. Alternatively, the musculoskeletal therapist may ask the client for formal consent to disclose any concerns to the veterinary surgeon that has their animal under their care.

This has come about as a result of RAMP Council consultation with DEFRA and the RCVS around clarification for veterinary consent for Competition and Maintenance Care.

To reiterate, the only difference to current practice is in point d). An animal declared healthy by the owner, in cases where care is given to maintain good health and optimise competition performance, can be seen without specific Veterinary referral with the caveats stated. This covers the areas of Maintenance care and Competition care ONLY.

This clarification will ease the current legal grey area and hope it will improve communication between MSK Practitioners and the Veterinary Profession. ANY pathology must be reported back to the animals registered vet immediately.

OSTEOPATHIC APPROACH TO THE CANINE PATIENT LEVEL ONE

Taught by Animal Osteopathy International

Level One Canine Course – open to a range of regulated clinical professionals. For more information: www.animalosteopathyinternational.com

Cohort entry until mid November – dual modality (online and on single consolidated practicum in 2021 or 2022 – as the student prefers).

Guidance for Animal Practitioners

With COVID on the rise again, please use common sense and follow RAMP and RVCS guidelines. We all know to ask pertinent COVID pre-screening questions in advance of a visit and to touch gates, head collars etc. as little as possible. PPE wearing should be relevant to each case, based on your ability to keep a 2m distance from any person on the yard on in a garden – during the entire session. Where possible, treat outside. If you are inside treating an animal, you must be sure to follow PPE and hygiene guidelines to the dot.

Take your own cleaning and sanitising products to your visits. Make sure your owners know that you have clean sanitized hands and arms before touching their animal (after you get out of the car). Don’t shake hands, as before. Take your own food and drink with you. And where possible, ensure that you have a change of clothes between visits, if you are not wearing protective disposable items that can be disposed of, in between patients. This is because COVID can last on material for up to 3 hours.

More recently it has been announced that professionals in close proximity to people outside their household must wear both mask and visor – even if teaching (as opposed to treating). So, if you cannot keep a 2 meter distance from your owners, you need to keep this in mind.